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Publications

2020

By Faculty

Bonne, S., Tufariello, A., Coles, Z., Hohl, B., Ostermann, M., Boxer, P., Sloan-Power, E., Gusmano, M., Glass, N., Kunac, A., & Livingston, D. (2020). Identifying participants for inclusion in hospital based violence intervention: An analysis of 18 years of urban firearm recidivism. The Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, 89(1), 68-73.

Identifying individuals at highest risk maximizes efficacy of prevention programs in decreasing recidivist gunshot wound (GSW) injury. Characteristics of GSW recidivists may identify this population. Hospital-based violence intervention programs (HVIPs) are one effective strategy; however, programs are expensive, therefore, when possible, epidemiologic data should guide inclusion criteria.  Seventeen years of all GSW patients presenting to an... Learn More

By Faculty, By Students

Bhardwaj, N.* and Apel, R. (2020). Societal gender inequality and the gender gap in safety perceptions: Comparative evidence from the international crime victims survey. European Journal of Criminology. 

This study considers whether societal gender inequality moderates the relationship between gender and perceptions of personal safety. Pooled 1992–2005 rounds of the International Crime Victims Survey, comprising more than 285,000 respondents from 75 countries, are used to estimate multilevel models of safety perceptions, with a cross-level interaction specified between gender and gender inequality. We find... Learn More

By Faculty

Demir, M., Apel, R., Braga, A.A., Brunson, R.K. and Ariel, B. (2020). Body worn cameras, procedural justice, and police legitimacy: A controlled experimental evaluation of traffic stops. Justice Quarterly 37: 53-84.

Police legitimacy is generally regarded as a view among community members that police departments play an appropriate role in implementing rules governing public conduct. Placing body worn cameras (BWCs) on police officers has been suggested as a potentially important response to police legitimacy crises. We use a rigorous controlled quasi-experimental evaluation to test the impact... Learn More

By Faculty

Berryessa, C.M.,  Coppola, F., and Salvato, G. (2020). The potential effect of neurobiological evidence on the adjudication of criminal responsibility of psychopathic defendants in involuntary manslaughter cases. Psychology, Crime, & Law.

Research on how neurobiological evidence influences jurors’ decision-making in adjudications of criminal responsibility is growing. Mock trial studies on this topic have almost entirely considered purposeful violent crimes, but the results of these studies are inconsistent. The present study tests the effects of neurobiological evidence (neuroimaging, clinical psychology, and genetics) on outcomes related to criminal... Learn More

By Faculty

Berryessa, C.M. and Krenzer, W. (2020). The stigma of addiction and effects on community perceptions of procedural justice in drug treatment courts.  Journal of Drug Issues.

We present a series of four between-subject, multifactorial experiments that examine how labeling offenders with addiction, as well as if that psychiatric label is described to be biologically influenced, may affect community perceptions regarding the importance of procedural justice in drug treatment courts. Stigmatization toward addiction is hypothesized to moderate community views on procedural justice.... Learn More

By Faculty

Berryessa, C.M. and Reeves, J. (2020).  The perceptions of juvenile judges regarding adolescent development in evaluating juvenile competency.  Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology.

This analysis provides the first known in-depth qualitative inquiry into if and how juvenile court judges take the psycho-social immaturity and development of adolescents into consideration when making attributions of adjudicative competency of offenders in juvenile court. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty-seven U.S. juvenile court judges, followed by grounded theory analysis. Competency evaluations from psychologists... Learn More

By Faculty

Berryessa, C. M. & Chandler, J. (2020). The role of the defense attorney in relation to biological interventions as rehabilitative strategies. Journal of Offender Rehabilitation.

We present a qualitative analysis, employing semi-structured interviews and grounded theory, on the perceptions of defense attorneys regarding their roles and duties in contexts involving quasi-coercive offers of biological interventions, such as medication-assisted treatment therapies for opiate dependence or chemical castration, as rehabilitative strategies in sentencing. Data are from interviews with a sample of Canadian... Learn More

By Faculty

Berryessa, C. M.  (2020). Compassionate Release as a “Right” in the Age of COVID-19. American Journal of Bioethics, 20, 185-187

In their article “Vexing, Veiled, and Inequitable:  Social Distancing and the “Rights”Divide in the Age of COVID-19,”Fairchild et al. (2020) argue that social distancing is a right to be “extended and defended.”  Specifically, such a right in the age of COVID-19 should extend equally across the population, and the authors astutely suggest that social distancing operates in a... Learn More

By Faculty

Berryessa, C.M. (2020). The effects of essentialist thinking toward biosocial risk factors for criminality and types of offending on lay punishment support. Behavioral Sciences & the Law.

This research uses experimental methods to gauge how different facets of essentialist thinking toward (1) types of offending and (2) biosocial risk factors for criminality predict lay punishment support. A randomized between‐subjects experiment using contrastive vignettes was conducted with members of the general public (N = 897). Overall, as hypothesized, aspects of essentialist thinking, particularly informativeness,... Learn More

By Faculty

Berryessa, C. M. & Chandler, J. (2020). The role of the defense attorney in relation to biological interventions as rehabilitative strategies. Journal of Offender Rehabilitation 59(7): 389- 415.

We present a qualitative analysis, employing semi-structured interviews and grounded theory, on the perceptions of defense attorneys regarding their roles and duties in contexts involving quasi-coercive offers of biological interventions, such as medication-assisted treatment therapies for opiate dependence or chemical castration, as rehabilitative strategies in sentencing. Data are from interviews with a sample of Canadian... Learn More

By Faculty

Berryessa, C.M. and Caplan, J.M. (2020). Cognitive and affective processing of risk information: A Survey experiment on risk-based decision-making related to crime and public safety. Frontiers in Psychology.

The current study, using a multi-factorial survey experiment with a sample of the general public (N=800), investigates if and how types of risk information on crime and public safety, such as maps, graphs, or tables, commonly used and communicated by law enforcement elicit dual-process (affective and cognitive) risk information processing in risk-based decision-making, and if... Learn More

By Faculty

Drawve, G., Kennedy, L. W., Caplan, J. M., & Sarkos, J. (2020). Risk of robbery in a tourist destination: a monthly examination of Atlantic City, New Jersey. Journal of Place Management and Development.

The purpose of this study is to identify potential changes in crime generators and attractors based on monthly models in a high-tourist destination.   A risk terrain modeling approach was used to assess spatial relationships between 27 crime generator and attractor types in Atlantic City, New Jersey with robbery occurrence for the 2015 calendar year. In... Learn More

By Faculty

Boxer, P., Drawve, G. & Caplan, J. M.* (2020). Neighborhood violent crime and academic performance: A geospatial analysis. American Journal of Community Psychology, 1-10.

Decades of empirical work have confirmed that experiences with violence are associated with a variety of adverse behavioral and mental health as well as academic outcomes for children and adolescents. Yet this research largely has relied on indirect measures of exposure. In this study, we apply geospatial analysis to examine the relation between neighborhood violent... Learn More

By Faculty, By Students

Caplan, J. M., Kennedy, L. W., & Neudecker, C. H.* (2020). Cholera deaths in Soho, London, 1854: Risk terrain modeling for epidemiological investigations. PLOS ONE, 1-11.

Risk Terrain Modeling (RTM) is a spatial analysis technique used to diagnose environmental conditions that lead to hazardous outcomes. Originally developed for applications to violent crime analysis, RTM is utilized here to analyze Dr. John Snow’s data from the 1854 cholera outbreak in London to demonstrate its potential value to contemporary epidemiological investigations. Dr. Snow... Learn More

By Faculty

Leverentz, A, Chen, E. & Christian, J. (2020). Beyond recidivism: New approaches to research on prisoner reentry and reintegration. New York: New York University Press.

Prison in the United States often has a revolving door, with droves of formerly incarcerated people ultimately finding themselves behind bars again. In Beyond Recidivism, Andrea Leverentz, Elsa Y. Chen, and Johnna Christian bring together a leading group of interdisciplinary scholars to examine this phenomenon using several approaches to research on recently released prisoners returning to... Learn More